Should Learners be Treated Differently Based on Capability?

To say that no two learners are the same is almost an axiomatic statement. This is clear to anyone who cares to think about it for a moment. If you take a classroom full of learners, give them the same instructions, under the same conditions while using the same assessments, you’ll get very different results.

The Implications of Neuroscience for Instructional Design

Neuroscience is a multidisciplinary field that aims to understand the workings of the nervous system, which of course, includes the brain. The sub-discipline of educational neuroscience is a rather recent development in the field that aims to understand the relationship between the biology of the brain and related structures with the learning process, framed inside

Are Your Compliance Practices Really Ethical?

If you work in an industry that has legal compliance requirements for things like safety training, your organisation is likely to have something in place that is focused predominantly on satisfying the compliance requirement so that you can get on with doing business while avoiding any penalties that could be imposed by a state authority.

Why does Buddy Training for SOP’s Work?

Every organisation is in possession of highly valuable procedural knowledge that lets it do what it does best in a unique way. An organisation is after all the sum of the knowledge and skill contained in the persons that make up its numbers.

What is Behavior Based Safety?

When you get down to it, what does it mean to learn something? What are we trying to achieve when we train someone? When you ask people this question you generally get responses that refer to new skills and giving people a better quality of life.

How to Deliver and Plan Great Toolbox Talks

Toolbox talks, as you may already know, are a popular way to strengthen your safety training efforts. Toolbox talks bolster one of the key principles of good safety practice: clear and concise communication practices. 

The Cost of Ignoring the Forgetting Curve

Whether you’ve heard it explicitly said or not, retention of information is a key issue in the design and execution of a training session or training programme series. The issue of fostering retention in general is a topic of vibrant discussion among educationalists. Even in a modern context where we all have information at the

How to Get Ahead of the Forgetting Curve

If you’ve spent any time delving into the theory behind corporate training you’ve probably heard of the “forgetting curve”. An observation first proposed by psychologist Hermann Ebbinghaus in the late 1800s. The least you need to know about the forgetting curve is that it shows how quickly people forget new learning. An hour after training half

Training and Retention: The Science of Forgetting

A key component of any training exercise is the retention of new information. Trainees are exposed to facts and techniques which they are expected to apply in practical contexts. As human beings we make use of our brain’s ability to retain information for later use, but remembering something is very different from saving something to

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